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Money, Life, and Regret


living intentionally reduces regret and gives meaning to life
❝Life is a gym membership with a really complicated cancellation policy.❞ -Rudy Francisco

My friend and I can't stop laughing. It's 1990, and we're watching a movie that we've seen a dozen times, Little Monsters. Little Monsters is a movie where Howie Mandel plays a monster that lives under Fred Savage's bed. I'm at my friend's place, and I have instructions that as soon as the movie is over, I have to go home. In other words, what's the movie is done, the fun's over.

Despite the fact that the end of the movie meant the end of fun, we still enjoy the movie. Knowing that there would be an end to the movie did not ruin the movie for us.


Looking back, I can imagine a scenario in which I was so worried about the movie ending that I didn't enjoy the movie at all. My worry could have ruined the experience altogether.

The movie might be a simple example, but if we slide the intensity all the way up, we'll find that the same applies to life. Many people are so worried about death that they ignore life altogether and, in doing so, look back on their life from their deathbed full of regrets.

Just because the end will come does not mean we can't enjoy the experience.


LIFE IS SHORT


It's easy to forget the fact that life is short. What happens after we die is both unknown and unknowable. The only thing we know for sure is that we are lucky enough to experience this life. We owe it to ourselves to not take this life for granted.


It's common for people who have near-death experiences or lose someone close to them to start to re-evaluate their lives. It's only when they run face-to-face with the reaper that they start to get their priorities straight.


Practicing gratitude is the antidote to taking our lives for granted. Practicing gratitude helps combat what psychologists call hedonic adaptation, or the idea that we get used to our surroundings very quickly.


Remembering the shortness of life is a springboard into a life of gratitude.